Exchange Server Client Access URL Configuration Script

In my career, I have to be able to be efficient as most of my projects are on a time crunch schedule. Being able to quickly configure Exchange when setting up a server environment is crucial to the success of the project.

While still honing my skills in PowerShell, I was attempting to create my own script to help configure all of the Virtual Directories in one shot rather than go to each setting and configure them manually. It did not go very well, so as I do, I research and find great professionals that do great work in scripting so that I may learn from them.

In doing so, I found Paul Cunningham’s script that performs this. I took the following script and modified it to add the PowerShell Virtual Directory to it as I like to configure that as well.

***YOU CAN REM THE LINES OUT SHOULD YOU NOT WANT TO CONFIGURE THAT DIRECTORY***

Here is my version of the script:

NOTES:

  • PowerShell script to configure the Client Access server URLs for Microsoft Exchange Server 2013/2016. All Client Access server URLs will be set to the same namespace.
  • If you are using separate namespaces for each CAS service this script will not handle that.
  • The script sets Outlook Anywhere to use NTLM with SSL required by default.
  • If you have different auth requirements for Outlook Anywhere use the optional parameters to set those.
  • The script sets PowerShell to use Basic with SSL required by default.
  • If you have different authentication requirements for PowerShell use the optional parameters to set those.
  • PowerShell was added to the settings. Please be sure to REM those lines of code should you NOT want to configure the PowerShell Virtual Directory.

USAGE:

HAPPY SCRIPTING!
POSITIVE ENERGY!
PLEASE COMMENT!

REFERENCES:
Exchange Server Client Access URL Configuration Script
PowerShell Script to Configure Exchange Server Client Access URLs

Installing an ‘IP-less’ Exchange Server 2019 Database Availability Group

Yesterday, I posted on how Exchange now uses the Resilient File System (ReFS) to optimize and protect Exchange critical files. Another layer of protection is using a database availability group (DAG) for redundancy and is a necessary factor when designing an Exchange Enterprise Environment.
In this example, I will walk you through the installation of an Exchange Server 2019 DAG as I configured in my environment. This DAG will contain two Exchange Servers in the same site with a third Windows Server 2019 server being the File Share Witness (FSW).

Two Server Exchange DAG Configuration

For my configuration, I configured two identical Windows Server 2019 VMs (same procs, RAM, vhdx drives, partitions, etc…). I configured the Exchange Data Volume using ReFS and mounted them to the same folder on the C: Drive on each server. This is very important for replication to take place successfully when the databases are added to the DAG.


I next went to the Admin server where the FSW would be hosted and added the Exchange Trusted Subsystem Account to the local Administrators group on that server:

IMPORTANT!
Add the Exchange Trusted Subsystem Account to the Local Administrators Group on the FSW.

NOTE: The reason that this is an ‘IP-less’ DAG is that I’m creating a DAG with no cluster administrative access point (CAAP). The DAG has no IP address of its own, and no computer object in Active Directory. The main implication of this is that backup software that relies on the CAAP or backup operations won’t work. This option of an ‘IP-less’ DAG was first introduced in Exchange Server 2013 SP1/CU4, so by now any decent backup products should support this configuration. But you should always verify this with your backup vendor of choice. Also be aware that this is only supported for DAGs that are running on Windows Server 2012 R2 (or later).

Next, we create the DAG from Exchange PowerShell using the New-DatabaseAvailabilityGroup cmdlet. Now remember that since you are using the ReFS system for your database volumes, you will need to specify the -FileSystem parameter within the cmdlet to assure proper setup and replication of the data files.

Next, we add the Exchange Servers that hold the databases that will be replicated within the DAG:

The DAG will now show the two servers as Operational Member Servers:

The FSW Directory was created on the admin01 server when the DAG was created. We can verify that with the following cmdlet:

Next, we add the databases that we want replicated to the DAG as replicated databases. I want all my Databases on EX01 to replicate to EX02 and vice versa for the EX02 Databases. I want the activation preference to remain on the server that the databases were originally created on so I will use the -ActivationPreference parameter to accomplish that. I will go into more detail on Activation Preference in another post.

Now we verify that the Database Copies are healthy on each replication member using the Get-MailboxDatabaseCopyStatus cmdlet. You will see a Healthy Status on the replicated copies:

POSITIVE ENERGY!
KILL NARCISSISM!
HAPPY TROUBLESHOOTING!

REFERENCES:
Installing an Exchange Server 2016 Database Availability Group

Using the Resilient File System for Exchange Server

In my ongoing effort for becoming more knowledgeable on Exchange Server, I found that the preferred new file system for Exchange Databases and Log files is the ReFS.
ReFS is not that new. Microsoft’s Resilient File System (ReFS) was introduced with Windows Server 2012. ReFS is not a direct replacement for NTFS, and is missing some underlying NTFS features, but is designed to be (as the name suggests) a more resilient file system for extremely large amounts of data.

Support for ReFS with Exchange Server

From Exchange Server 2013 and upwards (which includes Exchange Server 2019 today) Microsoft supports the use of ReFS for Exchange servers, and in fact they now recommend it as the preferred file system for Exchange Server 2019, within the following guidelines.

For Exchange Server 2013:

  • ReFS is supported for volumes containing Exchange database files, log files, and content index files.
  • ReFS is not supported for volumes containing Exchange binaries (the program files).
  • ReFS is not supported for volumes containing the system partition.
  • ReFS data integrity features must be disabled for the database (.edb) files or the entire volume that hosts database files.
  • Hotfix KB2853418 must be installed.
  • For Windows 2012, the following hotfixes must be installed:

This means that you should continue to use NTFS for your operating system and Exchange Server 2013 installation volume, but you can consider using ReFS for the volumes hosting Exchange databases, log files, and index files.

For Exchange Server 2016:

  • ReFS is supported for volumes containing Exchange database files, log files, and content index files.
  • ReFS is not supported for volumes containing Exchange binaries (the program files).
  • ReFS is not supported for volumes containing the system partition.
  • ReFS data integrity features are recommended to be disabled.
  • For Windows 2012, the following hotfixes must be installed:

This means that you should continue to use NTFS for your operating system and Exchange Server 2016 installation volume, and it is recommended ReFS for the volumes hosting Exchange databases, log files, and index files.

For Exchange Server 2019:

  • ReFS is supported for volumes containing Exchange database files, log files, and content index files.
  • ReFS is not supported for volumes containing Exchange binaries (the program files).
  • ReFS is not supported for volumes containing the system partition.
  • ReFS data integrity features are recommended to be disabled.

This means that you should continue to use NTFS for your operating system and Exchange Server 2019 installation volume, and it is recommended ReFS for the volumes hosting Exchange databases, log files, and index files.

Creating an ReFS Formatted Volume

In Windows Server during the New Volume Wizard when you get to the step for configuring File System Settings change the file system from NTFS to ReFS.

exchange-server-refs

NOTE: Using the New Volume Wizard does not give you the option to disable data integrity at the volume level. To set it at the volume level itself use PowerShell when configuring new volumes. I found this out the hard way and am now re-configuring my volumes to disable the Integrity Streams.

I needed to create the mount point to mount the volume to:

I then got a list of my available disks:

In my case, disk 2 was the one I needed to format and change. I had to create a new partition and then format it:

Once formatted, I mount the volume to the Directory created earlier:

NOTE: Partition 1 on a disk is always reserved for system files on the drive volume. So the active partitions will always start at 2.

Lastly, verify that the partition is online and that the Integrity Streams are turned off:

Additional Considerations

When you are deploying an Exchange 2016 or 2019 DAG and using Autoreseed, the disk reclaimer needs to know which file system to use when formatting spare disks. So when, creating a DAG in Exchange PowerShell, make sure to set the -FileSystem parameter. For Exchange Server 2013 DAGs, manually format the spare volumes with ReFS.

More coming soon. I will post how I setup the “IP-less” DAG for my environment and got replication functional for my Exchange Databases.

REFERENCES:
Exchange 2013 storage configuration options
Exchange 2016 Preferred Architecture
Exchange Storage for Insiders: It’s ESE (Ignite video)
ReFS Exchange Server Volumes
Preparing ReFS Volumes for Exchange

Set the profile pic for a single Exchange user via PowerShell

I wanted to update my picture within my Outlook profile and AD account really quickly without having to go through OWA to do so. I found this cmdlet that will allow for that picture to be changed very quickly via Exchange PowerShell.

NOTE: This can be done with On-Premises Exchange and Exchange Online PowerShell

Old picture within my account

First, download the picture you want to use to the computer that you want to run the cmdlet from. Also, make sure the picture is cropped and centered prior to running the cmdlet. I saved the pic to C:\temp for my scenario. The best format to use would be jpg. I named the file User1_Profile.jpg

Next, open Exchange PowerShell on the computer you saved the pic to and run the following cmdlet to change the photo:

Once completed, the Outlook client should be closed and reopen so that the new picture is visible in the profile.

Picture change completed

I will post how to perform this for multiple users for Exchange and Office365 in a later post.

REFERENCES:
Set User Photo with Exchange PowerShell

Purging Soft Deleted mailboxes from Exchange Server

If you’re a seasoned administrator, you have knowledge that in Exchange, the database settings will allow you to set the deleted mailbox retention. The default is 30 days, but sometimes you need to purge all those deleted mailboxes to do some ‘spring cleaning’ as it were. Note that doing these cmdlets does not change the ‘Whitespace’ of the database or the size. In my case, I had to purge everything of a toxic individual that was tainting my network much to my disappointment and did the following to complete that task.

The following cmdlet will seek all Soft Deleted mailboxes within the database you select and manually purge them from Exchange.

Now, should you only want to remove one mailbox, you will need to get the GUID of that Soft Deleted mailbox first so that you can enter it for the identity parameter.

You can also preform a similar task for a disabled mailbox:

You can perform the task on all disabled mailboxes for that database as well:

NOTE: I would be very careful when performing either of these cmdlets as they will completely purge the mailboxes from the schema. If these cmdlets assist you with your ‘spring cleaning’, I will have been happy to assist.

HAPPY PURGING!
PLEASE COMMENT!
IGNORANCE IS NOT BLISS!

References:
Purging Deleted Mailboxes on Exchange 2013

Server Monkey
LDLNET LLC’s Preferred Server Equipment Hardware Vendor

Exchange Hybrid Configuration Wizard Link

Wanted to do a quick post as I was working on my Hybrid Exchange Environment. I was unable to get the HCW to download and start from the Exchange Control Panel with the link provided on the page. This has happened to me for a while, so I went online and found a link that would work that could be downloaded and reused to open the HCW:

Hybrid Configuration Wizard Link

HOPE THIS HELPS!
LET ME HAVE KNOWLEDGE SHOULD THE LINK CHANGE!

References:
HYBRID CONFIGURATION WIZARD WON’T START ON WINDOWS 2016

Exchange Setup Repeatedly Says ‘A Restart from a Previous Installation is Pending’

I have had this issue with EVERY upgrade that I have ever attempted for Exchange Server from 2013 through 2019 CU1. You go to run the setup program and during the prerequisite checks, setup stops. The error listed is:

A restart from a previous installation is pending. Please restart the system and rerun setup.

During the prerequisite checks, Exchange Setup looks in the registry at the following keys:

  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Updates\UpdateExeVolatile
  • HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\PendingFileRenameOperations

Nine times out of ten, a restart does NOT remediate this error. In order for setup to continue properly, you must do the following:

  • Open regedit: Start > Run > regedit.exe
  • Set the HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Updates\UpdateExeVolatile key value to 0 or delete it if present. <– This one is usually NOT present.
  • Delete the HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\PendingFileRenameOperations key.
  • Re-run Setup.

You should now be able to run setup and upgrade your Exchange Server.

PLEASE COMMENT!
HAPPY TROUBLESHOOTING!

References:
A Restart From Another Installation Is Pending
Exchange Setup Fails – A Restart From Another Installation Is Pending
Microsoft Document – A Restart From Another Installation Is Pending