Importing User Photos to Office 365 in bulk for your company.

In a previous post, I showed how you could update one user’s photo for their Outlook and AD profiles via PowerShell. In this post, we will explore how to do this for your entire organization via PowerShell to Office365.

NOTE: I have not tested the scripts as I do not have enough mailboxes in my O365 tenant along with not using a ‘.’ in my alias. If the scripts are incorrect, please inform me with the correction and I will update accordingly.

Please make sure that your photos are reviewed before posting, and try to keep the file size of the photos to a minimum. In Office 365, there exists a limitation for the user photo not to be more than 10 KB in size, but I will show you how to get around that limitation.

Having a user photo for each of your users is very beneficial as it personalizes each account to a face in the company. The user photos can be viewed in below locations:

  • Outlook Web Access
  • Contact Card
  • Thumbnail in emails
  • Outlook Client
  • Yammer
  • Lync Client
  • SharePoint (People Search / Newsfeed)

Steps to take:

  1. Remove the 10KB photo size limitation in Exchange Online
  2. Prepare a folder with all users photos
  3. Update the profile photos via a PowerShell cmdlet.

Connect to Exchange Online with the RPS Proxy Method to remove the 10K size limitation

NOTE: In the PowerShell cmdlet above, we connected using a different proxy method. This was to overwrite the limitation of uploading the images with size more than 10KB. Using the different proxy method (/?proxyMethod=RPS ) to connect to Office 365 in the above cmdlet accomplishes this.

Prepare a folder locally and place all the photos in that folder

Create a folder named C:/UserPics and make the filename of each photo be the username of that particular user. (i.e. llingerfelt.png)
The below script should be able account for aliases that have a ‘.’ in the id as well. (i.e. lance.lingerfelt)

NOTE: From my research, there is no set photo type that is required for the photo. My suggestion would be to keep the photos .png for size constraints while maintaining picture clarity.

Update the profile pictures via PowerShell

Create the following script and name it Photos-Update.ps1

Run Photos-Update.ps1 and the script should upload the photos to Office 365 and apply each photo to the corresponding user.

NOTE: If you’re still having some issues with the alias having a ‘.’ in the name, you can also configure the Photos-Update.ps1 script in this manner to get that working properly:

HAPPY SCRIPTING!
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REFERENCES:
How to import Office365 User photos over 10KB & without CSV in bulk

Set the profile pic for a single Exchange user via PowerShell

I wanted to update my picture within my Outlook profile and AD account really quickly without having to go through OWA to do so. I found this cmdlet that will allow for that picture to be changed very quickly via Exchange PowerShell.

NOTE: This can be done with On-Premises Exchange and Exchange Online PowerShell

Old picture within my account

First, download the picture you want to use to the computer that you want to run the cmdlet from. Also, make sure the picture is cropped and centered prior to running the cmdlet. I saved the pic to C:\temp for my scenario. The best format to use would be jpg. I named the file User1_Profile.jpg

Next, open Exchange PowerShell on the computer you saved the pic to and run the following cmdlet to change the photo:

Once completed, the Outlook client should be closed and reopen so that the new picture is visible in the profile.

Picture change completed

I will post how to perform this for multiple users for Exchange and Office365 in a later post.

REFERENCES:
Set User Photo with Exchange PowerShell

Reconnecting Shared Mailboxes after an O365 Migration

I get a lot of these incidents in my queue after a user has been migrated to O365. For whatever reason, most likely due to the mailbox being moved itself, whether it is the user’s mailbox, the shared mailbox, or both, the connections to the shared mailboxes stop working in Outlook and the user cannot connect to the shared mailbox.

Here is a quick and easy solution to use to disconnect and reconnect the shared mailbox(es) that you lose connectivity to when migrated. This is usually performed on Outlook 2016 and above as most users upgrade their client software when moved to O365.

First, we remove the existing shared mailbox connection:

  • Click the File > Account Settings > Account Settings.
  • Select your company email address in the account list.
  • Click Change > More Settings > Advanced tab > Select the Shared Mailbox > Remove
  • Click Apply > OK > Next > Finish.
  • The shared mailbox will now automatically be removed in your Folder pane in Outlook.

Second, we re-add the shared mailbox connection to Outlook:

  • Click the File > Account Settings > Account Settings.
  • Select your company email address in the account list.
  • Click Change > More Settings > Advanced tab > Add
  • Type the name of the shared mailbox in the window and click OK.
  • Click Apply > OK > Next > Finish.
  • The shared mailbox will now automatically be added to your Folder List pane within Outlook.

Note: The above procedure must be followed in order to properly reconnect the shared mailbox. You cannot remove and re-add the mailbox in the same process as that will not reset the connection properly. You must save the settings when disconnecting.

I hope that this will assist everyone when troubleshooting Outlook connectivity issues to shared mailboxes after a migration.

HAPPY TROUBLESHOOTING!
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