Exchange 2010 Extended Support will end on October 13th, 2020

I wanted to pass this announcement along to everyone so that they are aware of the support ending for Exchange 2010. I personally have noticed a large number of Exchange 2010 environments starting to show age as the newer Outlook clients are having performance issues with Exchange 2010. If your team has not planned an upgrade to Exchange 2016 (you cannot upgrade directly from Exchange 2010 to 2019), I would advise that your team do so very soon. Exchange 2010 has been a great product for many years, but it is finally time for it to retire and allow the next generation of Messaging Services take the stage.

Formal Announcement:

Exchange 2010 End of Support extended to October 2020

Announced today, and in alignment with Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010, and after investigating and analyzing the deployment state of an extensive number of Exchange customers, Microsoft has decided to move Extended Support date for Exchange Server 2010 from January 14th 2020 to October 13th 2020.
After October 13th 2020, Microsoft will no longer provide technical support for problems that may occur with Exchange 2010 including:

– bug fixes for issues that are discovered and that may impact the stability and usability of the server
– security fixes for vulnerabilities that are discovered and that may make the server vulnerable to security breaches
– and time zone updates

Customer installations of Exchange 2010 will, of course, continue to run after this date; however, due to the changes and potential end of support risks, Microsoft strongly recommends customers migrate from Exchange 2010 as soon as possible.

FAQ’s

  • Can customers upgrade directly to Exchange 2019?
    Customers cannot upgrade directly from Exchange 2010 on-premises to Exchange Server 2019. They may upgrade to Exchange 2013 or 2016 directly from Exchange 2010 and we of course recommend Exchange 2016.
  • Since Exchange 2010 runs on Server 2008 and 2008R2, are those operating systems still supported?
    On January 14, 2020, support for Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2 will end. That means the end of regular security updates for these Windows customers. Since Exchange Server 2010 runs on top of Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2, it’s important for customers to consider how they will obtain security updates for the underlying operating system. Extended Security Updates for Server 2008 and 2008 R2 are now available for purchase and can be ordered from Microsoft or a Microsoft licensing partner. The delivery of Extended Security Updates (ESU) will begin after the End of Support dates, if and when available. 
  • Does Microsoft support Exchange 2010 on any other Server versions?
    Exchange Server 2010 SP3, with Update Rollup 26 or higher, installed on Windows Server 2012 R2 is supported until October 13, 2020.
  • That didn’t quite answer my question. If a customer calls between January 14 and October 13 2020, and is running Exchange 2010 on Server 2008 or 2008 R2, and does not have an ESU for Windows, can they still be assisted?
    Yes. Per the Lifecycle FAQ.
    If I am running a Microsoft product that is currently supported under the Lifecycle Policy, but my operating system is no longer supported, can I still receive support?
    If the problem is specific to the Microsoft product and it is within the Lifecycle Policy, Microsoft will provide support.
    If the problem is a result of the combination of the operating system and the Microsoft product, the problem will not be supported.
    More simply::
    Exchange 2010 on Server 2008 or 2008 R2: Starting January 14, 2020, provide support until a proven issue is found with the OS. This ends in October 2020.
    Exchange 2010 SP3 RU26+ on Server 2012 R2: We support regardless, but Exchange support still ends in October 2020.

  • Will Microsoft be offering Extended Support Updates (ESU’s) for purchase for Exchange 2010 customers?
    No.
  • What resources are available for customers? 
    – An upcoming Exchange Team blog post, titled “Exchange On-Premises Best Practices for Migrations from 2010 to 2016,” will provide great technical guidance for customers and support agents with their on-premises migrations.  
    – If migrating to Office 365 and Exchange Online, customers may be eligible to use the free Microsoft FastTrack service. FastTrack provides best practices, tools, and resources to make migration to Office 365 and Exchange Online as seamless as possible.
    – For customers that run into any problems during their migration to Office 365 and are not eligible for FastTrack, or if migrating to a newer version of Exchange Server, customers can of course utilize Support or the Exchange Technical Community.
    – Customers may also choose to engage a partner to help.  Microsoft has a great number of partners with deep skills in Exchange, and you can browse a list of Exchange partners at
    https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/solution-providers/home.

HAPPY UPGRADING!
CONTACT ME FOR QUESTIONS CONCERNING UPGRADING YOUR EXCHANGE ENVIRONMENT!

Create a custom Windows 10 image for distribution using and ISO image.

I’ve been currently assisting with onboarding at my new Full Time Contractor position at Microsoft. All of the new FTCs received laptops and needed to have the newest build of Windows 10 installed. The issue was that all of our laptops came with Windows 10 Professional and we needed to upgrade them to Enterprise edition.

After finding a working key for Enterprise Edition, we were still having issues joining the MS Azure domain so that we could get all of the needed software properly to being onboarding with Microsoft.

So, after going through a couple of re-images of my laptop with some failures attached to that, I finally was able to get the process down so that time would not be waisted for the oncoming new hires once they received their laptop. The issue was getting the correct build of Windows 10 and getting the proper apps installed in an efficient manner. Since the onboarding process was quickly moving, I needed to find a way to help streamline the process so the others would not have to go through all the mess I went through to get everything setup.

So, I began looking for a way to create a customized ISO for the build that would already have apps, settings, and customizations installed. I found this great article that details the process. I wanted to re-post this article here showing the steps I took to create the customized image by creating a VM in Hyper-V and then converting that completed image to an ISO that could be downloaded and utilized for the installation.

Creating a customized ISO image with pre-installed software and no user accounts

  • A generalized ISO image without any pre-set user accounts, with pre-installed software, desktop, File Explorer and Start customizations will be created.
  • All customizations and personalization will automatically be applied to all new user accounts
  • Clean install will perform a normal OOBE, asking for regional settings, initial user and so on
  • This ISO will be generalized meaning it is hardware independent and can be used to install Windows on any computer capable of running Windows 10, regardless if the machine is a legacy BIOS machine with MBR partitioning, or a UEFI machine with GPT partitioning
  • The ISO image will be bootable on both BIOS / MBR and UEFI / GPT systems

NOTE: This post will show how to use a virtual machine to create the ISO. All virtual machine references and instructions in this tutorial apply to Hyper-V, available in Windows 10 PRO, Education and Enterprise editions. Oracle VirtualBox and VMware users might need to consult their preferred virtualization platform’s documentation if instructions can’t be used as is.
Everything in this instruction can be made in each edition of Windows 10 (in Home and Single Language editions using a third party virtualization platform) with native Windows tools and programs, apart from Windows Deployment and Imaging Tools, part of Windows 10 Assessment and Deployment Kit (ADK) needed later in the post. The ADK is a free native Microsoft tool, downloadable directly from Microsoft.
If you will do this on a Hyper-V virtual machine (which is the recommended method), make sure to set the new virtual machine to use Standard Checkpoints instead of default Production Checkpoints. You can do this in virtual machine’s settings:

Name:  image.png
Views: 109048
Size:  81.9 KB
Use Standard Checkpoints
Virtual machine generation is irrelevant, you can use Generation 1 or 2 as you wish

This method will produce an ISO image which can be compared to any original Windows 10 ISO you download from Microsoft, apart from the fact that it already contains pre-installed software according to your choice. It will also contain a customized and personalized default user profile, the base Windows uses whenever a new user profile will be created.

A customized default user profile means that whenever a new user account is created, all customizations (Start tiles, File Explorer & desktop icon and view settings, colors, wallpaper, theme, screensaver and so on will be applied to new user profile instead of Windows defaults.

Installation using this ISO will take somewhat longer than using a standard ISO because it not only contains full Windows setup, but also the pre-installed software. Notice that depending on how much space pre-installed software takes, you might not be able to burn this ISO to a standard 4.7 GB DVD disk but have to use a dual layer disk or a USB flash drive instead. My customized image came out to be about 8.5 GB in size.

The ISO created will include no user profile folders, personal user data and files.

This ISO image can be used on any hardware setup capable of running Windows and can be shared, subject to people you share the ISO with have valid licenses and / or activation keys for both Windows 10 and pre-installed software.

System Preparation Procedure

  • Download the Windows ISO Installation tool from Microsoft
    • Use this TOOL to download the ISO and create the installation media
  • Install Windows 10 on your VM using the downloaded ISO

NOTE: The normal Windows Download from the link above will download Windows 10 Professional. You will need a key for the installation to upgrade to Enterprise Edition and you will need to be able to activate the copy of Windows to be able to save the customizations you create for your ISO.

  • Boot into Windows 10 and do the following:
    • Activate the Windows Edition your are installing with your key. You will require internet connectivity. I needed Enterprise Edition so I changed the Product Key In Settings to upgrade it from Professional.
    • Install your preferred software, customize and personalize Windows, remove / add Start tiles as you wish, and set your preferred group policies (group policies not available in Home and Single Language editions). Do not run any program you install!
    • Update all software and run Windows Update to get all the latest updates for the image.
    • Notice that software installed now will be included in ISO install media, and will be pre-installed for all users on each computer you install Windows to using this custom ISO.

NOTE: If Windows on your reference machine is not activated, you cannot personalize it. In this case you need to modify Windows theme (wallpaper, screensaver, colors, sounds) as you wish on another, activated Windows 10 machine, save the theme as a theme file, copy it to inactivated reference machine and apply (double click).
Also notice that Edge as well as other UWP apps do not work when signed in to built-in admin account. If you need a browser to download software you have to use a third party browser or Internet Explorer. IE can be started from Run dialog by typing iexplore and clicking OK.

  • Open an elevated command prompt and enter the following:

Windows will now restart in Audit Mode using built-in administrator account. You will see a Sysprep prompt in the middle of display:

Name:  image.png
Views: 107212
Size:  73.1 KB
Sysprep Program Window
Leave it open for now
  • Open Notepad, paste the following code to it, make the necessary changes to customize the installation, and save it as
    File name: unattend.xml (exactly this name!)
    Save as type: All files (important!)
    Save in folder: C:\Windows\System32\Sysprep

  • When Sysprepping with the Generalize switch, which we will soon do, the component CopyProfile being set to be TRUE in answer file has a small issue or rather a small inconvenience: it leaves the last used user folders and recent files of built-in admin to end user’s Quick Access in File Explorer.
  • To fix this, we need to reset Quick Access to default whenever a new user signs in first time. It requires the need to run a small batch file at first logon of new user, and then remove the batch file itself from user’s %appdata% so Quick Access will not be reset on any subsequent logon.
  • To do this, open an elevated (Run as administrator) Notepad (Notepad must be elevated to save in system folders), paste the following code to it, save it as:
    File name: RunOnce.bat (or any name you prefer, with extension .bat)
    Save as type: All files (important!)
    Save File in folder: %appdata%\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Startup

  • Delete all existing user accounts and their user profile data (Option One in this tutorial)
  • You are currently signed in using Windows built-in administrator account. In File Explorer, open C:\Users\Administrator folder and check that all user folders are empty deleting all possibly found content
  • Run Disk Clean-up, selecting and removing everything possible (tutorial)
  • When the disk has been cleaned, create a checkpoint of the VM from Hyper-V Manager. Right Click VM > Click Checkpoint
Manual Checkpoint from Hyper-V Manager
  • In Sysprep dialog still open on your desktop, select System Cleanup Action: Enter System Out-of-Box Experience (OOBE), select Shutdown Options: Shutdown, select (tick the box) Generalize, click OK:
Name:  image.png
Views: 110675
Size:  14.0 KB
Sysprep Selected Options Before Shutdown

Sysprep will now prepare Windows, shutting down machine when done. LEAVE THE VM OFF AND DO NOT RESTART IT! Now, we continue to the Image Creation section.

Name:  image.png
Views: 110209
Size:  3.4 KB
Sysprep Preparing the Machine

Image Creation Procedure

  • On your Hyper-V Host machine, open Disk Management
  • Select Attach VHD from Action menu:
Name:  image.png
Views: 109944
Size:  18.3 KB
  • Browse to and select your reference virtual machine’s VHD / VHDX file. If you have any checkpoints (AVHD / AVHDX files) created on this vm, select the one with most recent time stamp. Note that you have to select show all files to be able to see checkpoint AVHD / AVHDX files:
Click image for larger version.   Name:	image.png 
Views:	987 
Size:	94.6 KB 
ID:	113169
Select the most recent time stamped file
  • Select the check box labeled Read-only (this is very important!), then click OK:
Name:  image.png
Views: 110148
Size:  15.3 KB
BE SURE TO SELECT READ-ONLY

IMPORTANT: Forgetting to select Read-only will especially when mounting a checkpoint AVHD / AVHDX file make it unusable for Hyper-V! You will NOT be able to boot your VM and could corrupt it should you have write access on the mounted VHDX file.
Windows mounts the virtual hard disk, and all of its partitions, as separate disk. In case of an MBR disk it even mounts the system reserved partition.

Name:  image.png
Views: 110574
Size:  6.3 KB

NOTE: In the above picture the Windows system partition for the reference VM is drive K:

  • Open the Windows system partition VHD to be sure that’s the one where Windows is installed, note the drive letter your host assigned to it.
  • Open an elevated Command Prompt, enter the following command to create a new install.wim file:

NOTE: D:\install.wim path in this case is the drive and directory where you want to save the image file. K:\ path is the capture path with subfolders of the drive you want to image FROM

Click image for larger version.   Name:	image.png 
Views:	907 
Size:	26.5 KB 
ID:	113172
dism command

NOTE: The name given in /name switch in above command is irrelevant as we will name the ISO later on, but is needed for the command to run. Use any name you want to for the switch parameter.
The image process will take time, go get something to eat as I did. On my high end Hyper-V server this takes over 20 minutes, the first half of it without showing any progress indicator whatsoever. DISM works somewhat faster if you don’t use optional switches /checkintegrity and /verify but it is not recommended that you to create install.wim without checking its integrity and verifying it.

  • When completed capturing the image, detach the VHD / VHDX or AVHD / AVHDX file from host by right clicking it in Disk Management and selecting Detach VHD:
Name:  image.png
Views: 109850
Size:  28.5 KB
Detach the VHDX

ISO Image Creation Procedure

  • Mount the original Windows 10 ISO you downloaded in the first step to a Virtuial Drive on your Hyper-V Server Host.
  • Copy its contents (everything) to a folder you create on one of your Hyper-V host’s hard disks:
Click image for larger version.   Name:	image.png 
Views:	1221 
Size:	463.8 KB 
ID:	125114

I named the folder ISO_Files and placed it on the D: drive where I had created the image from the previous section. Alternatively, you can copy the contents of a created Windows 10 install USB or DVD to the ISO_Files​ folder.

  • Browse to your custom install.wim created earlier in previous section. Copy it to Sources folder under the ISO_Files folder, replacing the original install.wim in that directory:
Name:  image.png
Views: 110062
Size:  55.8 KB
Note

IMPORTANT: If the ISO you used when copying the files to the ISO_Files folder has been made with Windows Media Creation Tool, the ISO_Files\Sources folder contains an install.esd file instead of install.wim.
In this case you will naturally not get “File exists” prompt. Simply delete the install.esd file and paste your custom install.wim to replace it.
This will help reduce the overall size of the ISO and not confuse the installation process when ran.

  • Now, we download the latest Windows Assessment and Deployment Kit(ADK)for Windows 10: Windows ADK downloads – Windows Hardware Dev Center
    The full download for the ADK is about 7.5 GB but luckily we only need the Deployment Tools portion. So, unselect everything else except Deployment Tools and click Install:
Name:  image.png
Views: 106320
Size:  348.3 KB
Select Only Deployment Tools for the Installation
  • Once completed, you should have a folder within your start menu for the ADK Tools Installation under the folder Windows Kits. Start the Deployment and Imaging Tools interface program by Running the Program as an Administrator:
Name:  image.png
Views: 110029
Size:  38.8 KB
Right Click the Application and “Run As Administrator”
  • At the command prompt, type cd\ to bring your prompt to the root of the folder path you are on.
  • Type the following command to initiate creation of the ISO image file:

Replace three instances of d:\iso_files with the path to the ISO_Files folder where you copied Windows installation files. Notice that this is not a typo: first two of these instances are typed as argument for switch -b without a space in between the switch and argument. This is to tell the oscdimg command where to find boot files to be added to ISO.

Replace d:\14986PROx64.iso with the path where you want to store the ISO image. This is where you also name the ISO file what you want the file name to be.

Although the command seems a bit complicated, everything in it is needed. For more information about the oscdimg command line options, see: Oscdimg Command-Line Options

Click image for larger version.   Name:	image.png 
Views:	1467 
Size:	54.6 KB 
ID:	113179
Screenshot of the OSCDIMG command ran

You now have a completed ISO image ready for distribution to your machines. The overall process took me about 4 hours to complete with all the customizations that I did. Thanks again to Ten Forums for the article. I have provided references below for your convenience as well.

HAPPY IMAGING!!
PLEASE COMMENT!!

REFERNCES:
Create Windows 10 ISO image from Existing Installation
Open and Use Disk Cleanup in Windows 10
Download Windows 10
Windows 10 sysprep – how to skip entering product key
Windows ADK downloads – Windows Hardware Dev Center

The Windows Time Service, Hyper-V Hosts, and DCs that are VMs.

The sheer craziness of it all! I noticed that my clocks were off on my servers by FOUR minutes. I had originally set in group policy for the PDC emulator for my domain, a VM on one of my Hyper-V hosts, to get the time from the Public NTP hosts. I then configured a group policy to have all the other machines get their time from the PDC Emulator.

This was working great for me until I realized that my Hyper-V hosts were actually controlling the time of the VMs. They were also configured to get the time from the PDC Emulator, but essentially, due to how Hyper-V is configured, the PDC Emulator VM was getting the time from the Host. So, once the time got thrown off, everything went wacky on me!

I’d read through a couple of articles and found the configuration flaw of Hyper-V and the need for those servers to get their time from the external NTP hosts as well as be configured as NTP servers themselves. This totally went against my Group Policy configuration which caused the issue!

Luckily, I had a stand alone server that is a tertiary DC in the domain not running Hyper-V. I was able to get my time synced again properly after performing the following configuration.

  • I had to move the FSMO roles to the tertiary DC with the following cmdlet:

  • I then made sure the tertiary DC was syncing time correctly by running the following on that server:

  • I then removed the Group Policy Object for syncing the time source to the DC that I had linked to my Hyper-V Servers OU in Active Directory
  • Ran a gpupdate /force on the Hyper-V host to remove the policy there
  • I then had to reconfigure the Hyper-V hosts to be NTP Servers and clients that got their time from a public NTP server:

The one problem Hyper-V host that was syncing with the DC VM would not change settings via Group Policy nor through the w32tm cmdlet. I even went into the registry and tried to modify the following keys to make the changes stick:

The values would just not change, most likely due to the time not being synchronized. I had to reboot the server and then run through the process again in order for the changes to stick.

I did look at another article that said to do the following on the DC VM in order for time NOT to sync with the Hyper-V Host:

Go into Hyper-V console on the host machine, right-click on the client VM AD server, and select Settings. Once in here, on the left look under:

Management –> Integration Services
Untick Time Synchronization
Click Apply/OK

Virtual Machine Settings within Hyper-V

Things are running smoothly now. Please view the references at the bottom of the post. There are a couple of great articles about the Time Synchronization process with Hyper-V and why it needs to be setup the way I have it now. I wished I had read it before I originally set this up. I will post the article about getting group policy to handle the time sync process. Just remember, if your PDC Emulator is a VM, don’t sync it to a public NTP server. Sync it to your Hyper-V Host and have the Host sync publicly.
In the long run, I think it is a good design solution to have your Hyper-V hosts time synced to the Public NTP servers than having to remember to configure each VM DC you create to NOT time sync with the host. To each is own though, and one thing I learned from working Microsoft, there are multiple ways to get to the same goal that are technically sound methods.

THANKS FOR READING!
PLEASE COMMENT!

REFERENCES:
Setup of NTP on Hyper-V servers
Time Synchronization in Hyper-V
“It’s Simple!” – Time Configuration in Active Directory
NTP Circular Time Sync – Windows Server 2012 R2 / Hyper-V

Exchange Server Client Access URL Configuration Script

In my career, I have to be able to be efficient as most of my projects are on a time crunch schedule. Being able to quickly configure Exchange when setting up a server environment is crucial to the success of the project.

While still honing my skills in PowerShell, I was attempting to create my own script to help configure all of the Virtual Directories in one shot rather than go to each setting and configure them manually. It did not go very well, so as I do, I research and find great professionals that do great work in scripting so that I may learn from them.

In doing so, I found Paul Cunningham’s script that performs this. I took the following script and modified it to add the PowerShell Virtual Directory to it as I like to configure that as well.

***YOU CAN REM THE LINES OUT SHOULD YOU NOT WANT TO CONFIGURE THAT DIRECTORY***

Here is my version of the script:

NOTES:

  • PowerShell script to configure the Client Access server URLs for Microsoft Exchange Server 2013/2016. All Client Access server URLs will be set to the same namespace.
  • If you are using separate namespaces for each CAS service this script will not handle that.
  • The script sets Outlook Anywhere to use NTLM with SSL required by default.
  • If you have different auth requirements for Outlook Anywhere use the optional parameters to set those.
  • The script sets PowerShell to use Basic with SSL required by default.
  • If you have different authentication requirements for PowerShell use the optional parameters to set those.
  • PowerShell was added to the settings. Please be sure to REM those lines of code should you NOT want to configure the PowerShell Virtual Directory.

USAGE:

HAPPY SCRIPTING!
POSITIVE ENERGY!
PLEASE COMMENT!

REFERENCES:
Exchange Server Client Access URL Configuration Script
PowerShell Script to Configure Exchange Server Client Access URLs

Installing an ‘IP-less’ Exchange Server 2019 Database Availability Group

Yesterday, I posted on how Exchange now uses the Resilient File System (ReFS) to optimize and protect Exchange critical files. Another layer of protection is using a database availability group (DAG) for redundancy and is a necessary factor when designing an Exchange Enterprise Environment.
In this example, I will walk you through the installation of an Exchange Server 2019 DAG as I configured in my environment. This DAG will contain two Exchange Servers in the same site with a third Windows Server 2019 server being the File Share Witness (FSW).

Two Server Exchange DAG Configuration

For my configuration, I configured two identical Windows Server 2019 VMs (same procs, RAM, vhdx drives, partitions, etc…). I configured the Exchange Data Volume using ReFS and mounted them to the same folder on the C: Drive on each server. This is very important for replication to take place successfully when the databases are added to the DAG.


I next went to the Admin server where the FSW would be hosted and added the Exchange Trusted Subsystem Account to the local Administrators group on that server:

IMPORTANT!
Add the Exchange Trusted Subsystem Account to the Local Administrators Group on the FSW.

NOTE: The reason that this is an ‘IP-less’ DAG is that I’m creating a DAG with no cluster administrative access point (CAAP). The DAG has no IP address of its own, and no computer object in Active Directory. The main implication of this is that backup software that relies on the CAAP or backup operations won’t work. This option of an ‘IP-less’ DAG was first introduced in Exchange Server 2013 SP1/CU4, so by now any decent backup products should support this configuration. But you should always verify this with your backup vendor of choice. Also be aware that this is only supported for DAGs that are running on Windows Server 2012 R2 (or later).

Next, we create the DAG from Exchange PowerShell using the New-DatabaseAvailabilityGroup cmdlet. Now remember that since you are using the ReFS system for your database volumes, you will need to specify the -FileSystem parameter within the cmdlet to assure proper setup and replication of the data files.

Next, we add the Exchange Servers that hold the databases that will be replicated within the DAG:

The DAG will now show the two servers as Operational Member Servers:

The FSW Directory was created on the admin01 server when the DAG was created. We can verify that with the following cmdlet:

Next, we add the databases that we want replicated to the DAG as replicated databases. I want all my Databases on EX01 to replicate to EX02 and vice versa for the EX02 Databases. I want the activation preference to remain on the server that the databases were originally created on so I will use the -ActivationPreference parameter to accomplish that. I will go into more detail on Activation Preference in another post.

Now we verify that the Database Copies are healthy on each replication member using the Get-MailboxDatabaseCopyStatus cmdlet. You will see a Healthy Status on the replicated copies:

POSITIVE ENERGY!
KILL NARCISSISM!
HAPPY TROUBLESHOOTING!

REFERENCES:
Installing an Exchange Server 2016 Database Availability Group

Using the Resilient File System for Exchange Server

In my ongoing effort for becoming more knowledgeable on Exchange Server, I found that the preferred new file system for Exchange Databases and Log files is the ReFS.
ReFS is not that new. Microsoft’s Resilient File System (ReFS) was introduced with Windows Server 2012. ReFS is not a direct replacement for NTFS, and is missing some underlying NTFS features, but is designed to be (as the name suggests) a more resilient file system for extremely large amounts of data.

Support for ReFS with Exchange Server

From Exchange Server 2013 and upwards (which includes Exchange Server 2019 today) Microsoft supports the use of ReFS for Exchange servers, and in fact they now recommend it as the preferred file system for Exchange Server 2019, within the following guidelines.

For Exchange Server 2013:

  • ReFS is supported for volumes containing Exchange database files, log files, and content index files.
  • ReFS is not supported for volumes containing Exchange binaries (the program files).
  • ReFS is not supported for volumes containing the system partition.
  • ReFS data integrity features must be disabled for the database (.edb) files or the entire volume that hosts database files.
  • Hotfix KB2853418 must be installed.
  • For Windows 2012, the following hotfixes must be installed:

This means that you should continue to use NTFS for your operating system and Exchange Server 2013 installation volume, but you can consider using ReFS for the volumes hosting Exchange databases, log files, and index files.

For Exchange Server 2016:

  • ReFS is supported for volumes containing Exchange database files, log files, and content index files.
  • ReFS is not supported for volumes containing Exchange binaries (the program files).
  • ReFS is not supported for volumes containing the system partition.
  • ReFS data integrity features are recommended to be disabled.
  • For Windows 2012, the following hotfixes must be installed:

This means that you should continue to use NTFS for your operating system and Exchange Server 2016 installation volume, and it is recommended ReFS for the volumes hosting Exchange databases, log files, and index files.

For Exchange Server 2019:

  • ReFS is supported for volumes containing Exchange database files, log files, and content index files.
  • ReFS is not supported for volumes containing Exchange binaries (the program files).
  • ReFS is not supported for volumes containing the system partition.
  • ReFS data integrity features are recommended to be disabled.

This means that you should continue to use NTFS for your operating system and Exchange Server 2019 installation volume, and it is recommended ReFS for the volumes hosting Exchange databases, log files, and index files.

Creating an ReFS Formatted Volume

In Windows Server during the New Volume Wizard when you get to the step for configuring File System Settings change the file system from NTFS to ReFS.

exchange-server-refs

NOTE: Using the New Volume Wizard does not give you the option to disable data integrity at the volume level. To set it at the volume level itself use PowerShell when configuring new volumes. I found this out the hard way and am now re-configuring my volumes to disable the Integrity Streams.

I needed to create the mount point to mount the volume to:

I then got a list of my available disks:

In my case, disk 2 was the one I needed to format and change. I had to create a new partition and then format it:

Once formatted, I mount the volume to the Directory created earlier:

NOTE: Partition 1 on a disk is always reserved for system files on the drive volume. So the active partitions will always start at 2.

Lastly, verify that the partition is online and that the Integrity Streams are turned off:

Additional Considerations

When you are deploying an Exchange 2016 or 2019 DAG and using Autoreseed, the disk reclaimer needs to know which file system to use when formatting spare disks. So when, creating a DAG in Exchange PowerShell, make sure to set the -FileSystem parameter. For Exchange Server 2013 DAGs, manually format the spare volumes with ReFS.

More coming soon. I will post how I setup the “IP-less” DAG for my environment and got replication functional for my Exchange Databases.

REFERENCES:
Exchange 2013 storage configuration options
Exchange 2016 Preferred Architecture
Exchange Storage for Insiders: It’s ESE (Ignite video)
ReFS Exchange Server Volumes
Preparing ReFS Volumes for Exchange

Hyper-V General Access Denied error when trying to load a Virtual Hard Drive and start a VM

I was working on setting up a VM for my server farm and mis-configured one of the vhdx drives. I ended up having to delete that drive and recreate it in Hyper-V manager. When I did though, I received an error stating that I could not start the virtual machine:

An error occurred while attempting to start the selected virtual machine(s).
‘VMName’ failed to start. (Virtual machine ID ‘SomeID’)
‘VMName’ Microsoft Emulated IDE Controller (Instance ID ‘SomeID’): Failed to Power on with Error ‘General access denied error’ (0x80070005). (Virtual machine ID ‘SomeID’)
‘VMName’: IDE/ATAPI Account does not have sufficient privilege to open attachment ‘C:\Users\Public\Documents\Hyper-V\Virtual hard disks\DiskName.vhdx’. Error: ‘General access denied error’ (0x80070005). (Virtual machine ID ‘SomeID’)
‘VMName’:  Account does not have sufficient privilege to open attachment ‘V:\Hyper-V\Virtual hard disks\DiskName.vhdx’. Error: ‘General access denied error’ (0x80070005). (Virtual machine ID ‘SomeID’)

Causes

Each virtual machine is started using a virtual machine account. The virtual machine account needs read and write access to the .vhd/.vhdx file, but if the file has just been copied from somewhere then it most likely lacks the necessary file permissions.
That happened in my case because I had just created the vhdx drive and did not create it from the VM itself. I just attached it to the VM. So, when I booted the VM, it gave the error.

Remediation

There are a few ways that you could remediate the issue. The simplest way, if it is a new VM, is to remove the drive in the VM settings and then re-create it from scratch. That is what fixed it for me.
Another way is to add the VM GUID to the permissions so that it can access the vhdx file properly:

  • If you don’t already have the Hyper-V Manager error dialog open (“An error occurred while attempting to start the selected virtual machine(s) …”) then try to start the virtual machine now. You need the error open.
  • Click “See details”. This will show additional details, and will look something like:

‘PC-Name’ failed to start. (Virtual machine ID B9C4F7D4-0009-4BE2-90FB-9D60B1A06BDD) ‘PC-Name’ Microsoft Emulated IDE Controller (Instance ID XXXXXXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXXXXXXXXXX): Failed to Power on with Error ‘General access denied error’ (0x80070005). (Virtual machine ID B9C4F7D4-0009-4BE2-90FB-9D60B1A06BDD)
‘PC-Name’: IDE/ATAPI Account does not have sufficient privilege to open attachment ‘E:\Hyper-V\PC-Name\Virtual Hard Disks\MyVHD.vhdx’.
Error: ‘General access denied error’ (0x80070005). (Virtual machine ID B9C4F7D4-0009-4BE2-90FB-9D60B1A06BDD)
‘PC-Name’: Hyper-V Virtual Machine Management service Account does not have sufficient privolege to open attachment ‘E:\Hyper-V\PC-Name\Virtual Hard Disks\MyVHD.vhdx’.
Error: ‘General access denied error’ (0x80070005). (Virtual machine ID B9C4F7D4-0009-4BE2-90FB-9D60B1A06BDD)
Where PC-Name will be the name of your virtual PC. The long sequence of letters and numbers (in my case above “B9C4F7D4-0009-4BE2-90FB-9D60B1A06BDD”) is the Virtual Machine ID. This number is significant and you need it to fix the problem.

  • On the host server open an elevated command prompt.
  • Enter the following:

You will need to substitute the path to the vhd/vhdx file – you can obtain this from the original error message, and the Virtual-Machine-ID that you obtained from the “See details” part of the error.

So the line for me was:

NOTE: If you get the message “Failed processing 1 files” then check the virtual machine ID.

  • Now try to start the virtual machine. The error should no longer be present.

There is also a PowerShell Gallery script that is supposed to remediate this issue:

http://www.ntsystems.it/page/PS-Restore-VMPermissionps1.aspx

I haven’t tried it but it looks as it would work. Please review and leave a comment should you have issues with the script.

HAPPY TROUBLESHOOTING!
PLEASE COMMENT!
POSITIVE ENERGY!

REFERENCES:
Resolved: Hyper-V General access denied error when trying to load a Virtual Hard Drive
Restore-VMPermission
Virtual machine fails to start with General access denied error / Account does not have sufficient privilege to open attachment

Microsoft 365 Tenant-Level Services Licensing Guide

I was going through my LinkedIn feed as I do daily and found a post with the following document. Great post and document. I wanted to add this here to my blog for reference and to share with all of you!

The document includes the following topics:

Overview
Azure Active Directory Identity Protection
Azure Advanced Threat Protection
Azure Information Protection
Office 365 Advanced Threat Protection
Office 365 Cloud App Security
Microsoft Cloud App Security
Office 365 Advanced Data Governance
Office 365 Advanced eDiscovery
Office 365 Customer Key
Office 365 Customer Lockbox
Privileged Access Management in Office 365
Data Loss Prevention for Exchange Online, SharePoint Online, and OneDrive for Business
Data Loss Prevention for Teams chat and channel conversations
Information barriers
Advanced Message Encryption

Download your copy of this document as reference:

POSITIVE ENERGY SUCCEEDS!
PLEASE COMMENT!

Error 801c0003 when joining computer to Azure AD

I just received my new laptop for my current project and was setting up Windows 10 to join the company Azure AD domain. When I got to the part where you join, I received the following error:

Error Joining Computer to Azure AD

Turns out that my account is unable to domain join a device to the tenant. This is easily solved though. You have your tenant admin perform the following:

Go to Azure Active Directory -> Devices
Check the device settings, in particular the options:

Users may join devices
Maximal number of devices

Azure AD Settings Page

Now, in my case, I did not have access as I am NOT a tenant admin:

So, I am currently waiting for my IT department to resolve the access issue and grant me access to join the device to the domain. Just be sure to look at this if you’re having issues setting up your Windows 10 device to join your Azure tenant!

HAPPY TROUBLESHOOTING!
POSITIVE ENERGY!

References:
Issue Joining A Device To An Azure AD Tenant Domain

Importing User Photos to Office 365 in bulk for your company.

In a previous post, I showed how you could update one user’s photo for their Outlook and AD profiles via PowerShell. In this post, we will explore how to do this for your entire organization via PowerShell to Office365.

NOTE: I have not tested the scripts as I do not have enough mailboxes in my O365 tenant along with not using a ‘.’ in my alias. If the scripts are incorrect, please inform me with the correction and I will update accordingly.

Please make sure that your photos are reviewed before posting, and try to keep the file size of the photos to a minimum. In Office 365, there exists a limitation for the user photo not to be more than 10 KB in size, but I will show you how to get around that limitation.

Having a user photo for each of your users is very beneficial as it personalizes each account to a face in the company. The user photos can be viewed in below locations:

  • Outlook Web Access
  • Contact Card
  • Thumbnail in emails
  • Outlook Client
  • Yammer
  • Lync Client
  • SharePoint (People Search / Newsfeed)

Steps to take:

  1. Remove the 10KB photo size limitation in Exchange Online
  2. Prepare a folder with all users photos
  3. Update the profile photos via a PowerShell cmdlet.

Connect to Exchange Online with the RPS Proxy Method to remove the 10K size limitation

NOTE: In the PowerShell cmdlet above, we connected using a different proxy method. This was to overwrite the limitation of uploading the images with size more than 10KB. Using the different proxy method (/?proxyMethod=RPS ) to connect to Office 365 in the above cmdlet accomplishes this.

Prepare a folder locally and place all the photos in that folder

Create a folder named C:/UserPics and make the filename of each photo be the username of that particular user. (i.e. llingerfelt.png)
The below script should be able account for aliases that have a ‘.’ in the id as well. (i.e. lance.lingerfelt)

NOTE: From my research, there is no set photo type that is required for the photo. My suggestion would be to keep the photos .png for size constraints while maintaining picture clarity.

Update the profile pictures via PowerShell

Create the following script and name it Photos-Update.ps1

Run Photos-Update.ps1 and the script should upload the photos to Office 365 and apply each photo to the corresponding user.

NOTE: If you’re still having some issues with the alias having a ‘.’ in the name, you can also configure the Photos-Update.ps1 script in this manner to get that working properly:

HAPPY SCRIPTING!
PLEASE COMMENT!

store.ldlnet.net
LDLNET LLC! Your Source for Pofessional IT Services!
www.servermonkey.com
Contact ServerMonkey.com for your IT Hardware Needs!

REFERENCES:
How to import Office365 User photos over 10KB & without CSV in bulk

Issue with NAT on Cisco ASA

I was working on upgrading my ASA firewall and was running into an issue with internet working on my device, but none of my server services were responding to requests:

Result:
input-interface: outside
input-status: up
input-line-status: up
output-interface: inside
output-status: up
output-line-status: up
Action: drop
Drop-reason: (no-adjacency) No valid adjacency

I had configured 1-to-1 Object Based NAT translations for my servers for this purpose as had been configured on my prior ASA device. I had just copied the NAT rules to the new device thinking that it should just work. Needless to say, I had to call Cisco TAC and open a case. This seemed to be an issue for them as well. We kept getting the same error as above with another error listed during the NAT translation of the packets:

ifc selected is not same as preferred ifc
Doing route lookup again on ifc inside

We could ping internally to the server successfully from the ASA through the inside port:

LDLNET-FW01(config)# ping LDLNET-LAN 192.168.100.x
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.100.x, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/1/1 ms

Packet Capture:

4 packets captured
1: 01:01:21.086894 192.168.100.2 > 192.168.100.x: icmp: echo request
2: 01:01:21.087153 192.168.100.x > 192.168.100.2: icmp: echo reply
3: 01:01:21.087886 192.168.100.2 > 192.168.100.x: icmp: echo request
4: 01:01:21.088069 192.168.100.x > 192.168.100.2: icmp: echo reply

Again, I had created Object based NAT translations that should have worked for all the inside ports and allowed the packet traffic through properly:

object network Exchange_Server
nat (any,any) static ExchOut net-to-net

Not having knowledge what the net-to-net statement within the NAT Rule stood for, we ended up scrapping all of the Object based NAT rules and created a new rule using a static route:

nat (LDLNET-LAN,outside) source static Exchange_Server ExchOut description Exchange NAT Both Directions

Doing this worked for us and allowed traffic that was NOT translating correctly to be translated and flowing correctly through the ASA.

Phase: 17
Type: FLOW-CREATION
Subtype:
Result: ALLOW
Config:
Additional Information:
New flow created with id 12345, packet dispatched to next module
Module information for forward flow …
snp_fp_tracer_drop
snp_fp_inspect_ip_options
snp_fp_tcp_normalizer
snp_fp_translate
snp_fp_adjacency
snp_fp_fragment
snp_ifc_stat

Module information for reverse flow …
snp_fp_tracer_drop
snp_fp_inspect_ip_options
snp_fp_translate
snp_fp_tcp_normalizer
snp_fp_adjacency
snp_fp_fragment
snp_ifc_stat

Result:
input-interface: outside
input-status: up
input-line-status: up
output-interface: LDLNET-LAN
output-status: up
output-line-status: up
Action: allow

Great! This is working now! The only issue is that I had to create static rules that go through the single interface on the ASA. What if I need to connect other devices to the ASA on different interface ports? Well, I will have to create the static NAT rules for those ports as well. If the current interface fails, I will have to recreate the static NAT Rules for the interface port that I change to. Secure in a way, but not how I think it should be designed.

If anyone has any suggestions for the configuration of this, why I was getting the error, or a way to get the Object Based NAT rules working properly, PLEASE COMMENT!

I’M ALWAYS LOOKING FOR THE BEST SOLUTION!
PLEASE LEAVE YOUR COMMENTS!

LDLNET LLC (844) 884-7838
Contact sales@ldlnet.net for more information!

Set the profile pic for a single Exchange user via PowerShell

I wanted to update my picture within my Outlook profile and AD account really quickly without having to go through OWA to do so. I found this cmdlet that will allow for that picture to be changed very quickly via Exchange PowerShell.

NOTE: This can be done with On-Premises Exchange and Exchange Online PowerShell

Old picture within my account

First, download the picture you want to use to the computer that you want to run the cmdlet from. Also, make sure the picture is cropped and centered prior to running the cmdlet. I saved the pic to C:\temp for my scenario. The best format to use would be jpg. I named the file User1_Profile.jpg

Next, open Exchange PowerShell on the computer you saved the pic to and run the following cmdlet to change the photo:

Once completed, the Outlook client should be closed and reopen so that the new picture is visible in the profile.

Picture change completed

I will post how to perform this for multiple users for Exchange and Office365 in a later post.

REFERENCES:
Set User Photo with Exchange PowerShell

Purging Soft Deleted mailboxes from Exchange Server

If you’re a seasoned administrator, you have knowledge that in Exchange, the database settings will allow you to set the deleted mailbox retention. The default is 30 days, but sometimes you need to purge all those deleted mailboxes to do some ‘spring cleaning’ as it were. Note that doing these cmdlets does not change the ‘Whitespace’ of the database or the size. In my case, I had to purge everything of a toxic individual that was tainting my network much to my disappointment and did the following to complete that task.

The following cmdlet will seek all Soft Deleted mailboxes within the database you select and manually purge them from Exchange.

Now, should you only want to remove one mailbox, you will need to get the GUID of that Soft Deleted mailbox first so that you can enter it for the identity parameter.

You can also preform a similar task for a disabled mailbox:

You can perform the task on all disabled mailboxes for that database as well:

NOTE: I would be very careful when performing either of these cmdlets as they will completely purge the mailboxes from the schema. If these cmdlets assist you with your ‘spring cleaning’, I will have been happy to assist.

HAPPY PURGING!
PLEASE COMMENT!
IGNORANCE IS NOT BLISS!

References:
Purging Deleted Mailboxes on Exchange 2013

Server Monkey
LDLNET LLC’s Preferred Server Equipment Hardware Vendor

HTTP to HTTPS redirect for websites in IIS

I’ve been building this blog along with my consulting business and needed to secure my websites with SSL for BBB accreditation. That accreditation is still pending at this time, but I want to show good faith in business practices to attain that accreditation.

So, I purchased my certificate and preformed the following to assure that all traffic to my websites are SSL secured. There are a number of ways to do it, and even do it for Exchange, (which I will cover in another post), but I found a great article that is simple and will work for most standard web sites. The link will be at the bottom in the references section. 🙂

Redirect all HTTP traffic for your website to HTTPS

  • You will need to download the URL Rewrite Tool: Instructions HERE
  • Ensure that the IIS site you are using is configured for the proper port 80 binding. In this case we are listening for all traffic on port 80. But you could restrict this based on host header as needed
  • Next, once URL Rewrite is installed, create a new URL Rewrite Rule on the website that you want to make the change on:
Steps to create a new URL Rewrite Rule
  • Use the following steps exactly to create the redirection properly for your website:
  • Match URL Setting:
    • Name your rule (i.e. ‘http to https’)
    • Requested URL: ‘Matches the Pattern’
    • Using: ‘Wildcards’
    • Pattern: ‘*’
    • Ignore Case: ‘Checked’
  • Conditions Setting:
    • Click Add
    • Condition Input: ‘{HTTPS}’
    • Check if input string: ‘Matches the pattern’
    • Pattern: ‘off’
    • Ignore Case: ‘Checked’
  • Server Variables Setting:
    • No Settings Changed or Added
  • Action Setting:
    • Action Type: ‘Redirect’
    • Action Properties
      • Redirect URL: ‘https://{HTTP_HOST}{REQUEST_URI}’
      • Append Query String: ‘Checked’
      • Redirect Type: Found (302)

Note: In this example {HTTPS}, {HTTP_HOST}, and {REQUEST_URI} are all URL parts that can be accessed using the URL Rewrite module. More information on URL parts can be found here.

  • Apply the rule so that it is saved to IIS
  • Perform an IISRESET from an Administrative PowerShell Session or Command Prompt to Enable all the settings properly

Changes Made

The URL rewrite rules get written to the web.config file for the site you are working in. For example, the above configuration should result in this addition to the web.config file:

That should take of it all for you and now when users connect to your website via http, they will be automatically redirected to https SSL.

HAPPY CONFIGURING!
PLEASE COMMENT!

LDLNET - Banner
LDLNET LLC – Life In Action! Your Source for Professional IT Services!

References:
Creating Rewrite Rules for the URL Rewrite Module
URL Rewrite for IIS7 http to https redirection
URL Component Reference
Redirect from HTTP to HTTPS using the IIS URL Rewrite module

Customize your Outlook Web App Logon Page

As many of you are aware, Microsoft provides a default logon page for OWA, the Outlook Web App. Most companies, like myself want to be able to customize that page so that it suites your organization. Here is what my company OWA page looks like:

Customized OWA Logon Page

I have changed the color on the left to match my scheme, replaced the Outlook Logo with my company logo, and added a disclaimer to notify users. Below is the process to do that effectively for your organization.

NOTE: Every time you install an Exchange Cumulative Update (CU) or new version of Exchange Server these modified files will be replaced. Remember to backup your original and changed files to another folder so that you can replace them when you Update or Upgrade or if something goes wrong with the changes.

Customize the color of the Outlook on the web sign-in page

  • Use Notepad to open the file:

%ExchangeInstallPath%FrontEnd\HttpProxy\owa\auth\<ExchangeVersion>\themes\resources\logon.css

  • In the logon.css file, replace the default blue hexidecimal color value #0072c6 with the HTML RGB value that you want to use. You can use the following LINK to choose the color you wish to use.
  • When you’re finished, save and close the file.

Here are the different graphics that can be changed on the OWA logon page and their associated files:

Outlook on the Web sign-in page with element call-outs
ImageFile nameLocationDimensions (width x height in pixels)Bit depth

favicon.ico 
%ExchangeInstallPath%FrontEnd\HttpProxy\owa\auth\<ExchangeVersion>\themes\resources
16 x 16 
32 

olk_logo_white.png 
%ExchangeInstallPath%FrontEnd\HttpProxy\owa\auth\<ExchangeVersion>\themes\resources
128 x 108 
32 

owa_text_blue.png 
%ExchangeInstallPath%FrontEnd\HttpProxy\owa\auth\<ExchangeVersion>\themes\resources
300 x 76 
32 

Sign_in_arrow.png (for left-to-right languages) 
Sign_in_arrow_rtl.png (for right-to-left languages) 
%ExchangeInstallPath%FrontEnd\HttpProxy\owa\auth\<ExchangeVersion>\themes\resources
22 x 22 
32 
  • Just resize your images to the given dimensions in the table, rename them to the file name, and replace the files in the directory.

Change the disclaimer text for your OWA logon page

Next, we want to add a disclaimer to our logon page. To do that, we need to modify the logon.aspx document in the following directory:

%ExchangeInstallPath%FrontEnd\HttpProxy\owa\auth\logon.aspx

Open the file in Notepad or your favorite HTML editor and search for the text ‘hidden-submit’. When you find the text, you can add your disclaimer text under the div class=”disclaimer” tag as I did in the following example:

Save your logon.aspx file and give your OWA server an IISRESET for good measure. You should be good to logon with the new page from that point on.

HAPPY CONFIGURING!
PLEASE COMMENT!
THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT!

References:
Customize the Outlook on the web sign-in, language selection, and error pages in Exchange Server
CUSTOMIZE EXCHANGE 2016 OUTLOOK ON THE WEB SIGN IN PAGE
Customizing Exchange 2016 OWA

Unable to open settings from the Settings App in Windows Server 2016/2019

In Windows Server 2016/2019 you have been upgraded to the Windows 10 Desktop Experience GUI. So, in the new versions, you are directed to use the Gear Box in Windows to get to your settings. What was happening within the Settings is that I would choose a setting that calls on the control.exe file to open a Control Panel app. I would get the following error when attempting to do that function:

Permission Denied to Open a CPL Applet through control.exe

I immediately think it is a permissions issue. So I go to try to validate the permissions so that I could change them. Turns out, that due to it being a Windows System directory, I couldn’t modify the permissions without compromising directory security with NTFS permissions:

The options are all greyed out for the directory on purpose

Now, if I open Control Panel, Network Sharing Center, etc…, I was able to access the applets with no issues. This was just happening in the Settings Gear Box Application. So, I started looking around and found that there is a registry key that needs to be modified so that your Administrator account can open these settings apps through the Settings Application:

1) Launch the Registry Editor (regedit.exe)
2) Navigate to:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System

3) Change the value of FilterAdministratorToken (REG_DWORD) from 0 to 1 (If you don’t see that key, you can create it by right-clicking on any empty space from the right panel and select New > DWORD value, type the name and set the value to 1)
4) Reboot the computer and then it will be working fine.

I decided to create a Group Policy in AD to add this registry key so that it would propagate to all my 2016/2019 Servers:

1) Launch the Group Policy Manager
2) Create a new GPO and Link it to your Domain
3) Go to Computer Configuration > Preferences > Windows Settings > Registry > New Registry Key (DWORD)
4) Set the Action to “Replace”
5) Set the path as:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System
6) Set the Key as FilterAdministratorToken
7) Set the Value as 1 (Decimal Format) and Save
8) Run gpupdate /force on your servers.
9) Schedule a Reboot of those servers for the change to truly take effect.

GPO Settings

After the reboot of the server, all the apps launched correctly from the Settings Application within Windows. I am going to research a little more to see why this is like that. If you have a comment, or more information, please feel free to post!

HAPPY TROUBLESHOOTING!
PLEASE COMMENT!

Installation of Exchange Server 2019 on Windows Server 2019

I have realized recently that I am an Exchange Messaging Professional, but yet, I have not posted the methodology of how I install an Exchange Server Mailbox Role. So here it is!

Install Windows Server 2019

Exchange Server 2019 requires Windows Server 2019 to run. For my environment, I haven’t necessarily need to follow all the enterprise level design aspects of database numbers to mailbox size ratios, number of servers, front/back end configurations, DAG Implementation, etc… If you want or need to delve into that realm, you can go here. I have need for a single server with only a few databases for a small number of mailboxes, so I am approaching it from that standpoint.

So first, in Hyper-V, I configured my VM with the following specifications:

Processors: 2 procs with 2 cores each – 4 Virtual Processors Total
RAM: 32GB with dynamic memory enabled optional
Drives: 2 .vhdx drives of 120GB each (OS / Exchange Data)
CD: Windows 2019 ISO
Default Settings for the rest of the VM Settings

Next I installed Windows Server 2019 Datacenter with the GUI! You can install it on Server Core if you wish. That information can be found in this link.

I ran through the setup of Windows and installed the OS on my first vhdx drive. I booted up, set the local admin password, and logged in. Once in Windows, I went to the Local Server Settings in Server Manager and configured the following settings:

Set the Date, Time, and Time Zone. (Once in the Domain, this would sync through Group Policy)
Set IE ESC to allow Administrators to have full IE access.
Set Remote Desktop Settings to gain RDP access. (This would be locked down with Group Policy as well once on the Domain)
Set the IP Settings to Static Settings. (DNS Servers, Gateway, WINS, etc…)
Join the server to the Active Directory Domain.
Reboot the VM Server.
Logon to your Domain.
Configure Windows Update Settings. (I have WSUS through Group Policy, this was configured automatically upon reboot)
Download and install all Windows Updates for the server. Then Reboot.
Open Disk Management and configure the secondary vhdx drive to be your Exchange Data Drive.
I configured the drive to be a mounted folder ‘C:\Exchange\Data’ rather than another drive letter as that seems to be the more accepted form of installation for the data drive these days. That is based on the multiple configurations that I have seen for Exchange through experience in Enterprise environments. Again, to each is own and depending on you design specifications, you might want to do that differently.

Next, we need to install the prerequisites for the Exchange Mailbox Server. I have always used practical365.com to get the PowerShell script to install the prerequisites, but couldn’t find the article this time. Great site though! Instead, I got the information and ran the following from an elevated PowerShell Session locally on the server:

As part of the prerequisites you will need to install the following packages onto the server as well:

UCMA Runtime Install
Visual C++ Redistributable Packages for Visual Studio 2013

Once completed, you can begin the install of Exchange. If this is your first Exchange 2019 Server in your Organization, then you will need to run the following to update the Forest, Schema, and Domain so that Exchange will install properly:

NOTE: If you run into Prerequisite issues with the installation due to a “pending reboot”, check out my blog post for information on remediation of that issue.

Now that the environment is prepared for Exchange, you can actually begin the installation. I wanted to make my default database and logs folder to be on the Exchange Data volume that I created, so I included those settings in the setup command. Please look at the reference to the setup.exe switches for more information on that. Here is the command:

Setup should go through the installation via the PowerShell window and complete successfully. Reboot the Exchange Server, then you can then logon to the Exchange Admin Center and begin the process of configuration of how you need to integrate the Mailbox Server into your Server Farm. That configuration is for a later post.

PLEASE CHECK BACK FOR UPDATES!
PLEASE COMMENT!

References:
UCMA Runtime Install
Visual C++ Redistributable Packages for Visual Studio 2013
Install Exchange Server 2019 on Windows Server 2019 Core
Exchange Server Design Planning
Use unattended mode in Exchange Setup
Practical365 on Exchange 2019

Exchange Hybrid Configuration Wizard Link

Wanted to do a quick post as I was working on my Hybrid Exchange Environment. I was unable to get the HCW to download and start from the Exchange Control Panel with the link provided on the page. This has happened to me for a while, so I went online and found a link that would work that could be downloaded and reused to open the HCW:

Hybrid Configuration Wizard Link

HOPE THIS HELPS!
LET ME HAVE KNOWLEDGE SHOULD THE LINK CHANGE!

References:
HYBRID CONFIGURATION WIZARD WON’T START ON WINDOWS 2016

Hyper-V 2019 will NOT mount ISO from a network share.

Like most IT guys. They have a repository of their ISO images saved on a network share so that they can mount the ISO if needed on multiple machines. I recently switched to Hyper-V and have been having an issue with creating VMs and using my ISO from my network share to do so.
Hyper-V Manager available through RSAT doesn’t have an option to mount an ISO or capture a drive from a machine on which is running. Instead it gives you drives of the Hyper-V host, and that would of course require you to have an ISO or the disc itself present on the host. I didn’t want to do that. I would rather have my repository share available for that purpose to allow for all the drive space to be available on the Hyper-V host.

So, I would map a network drive with my ISOs. The mapping would succeed, but mapped drive (letter) will not be visible in Hyper-V manager when trying to mount an ISO. Okay, so next I tried mounting from UNC share directly, but that would also fail, with the message:
“‘VM’ failed to add device ‘Virtual CD/DVD Disk’” “User account does not have permission required to open attachment”.

hyperv1
Access Denied Error when trying to mount the ISO

It goes back to the constrained delegation requirement for the Hyper-V host accounts to be used to perform functions such as this. This has been a pain to say in the least, as I have also had issues with live migration with my machines not being clustered due to different hardware.

So, in researching, I found this blog post. It has helped me through this issue with mapping the shared folder with the ISOs.

The cause of the problem is that the Hyper-V is intended to run with VMM Library Server and to mount files from it, not any random share. To re-mediate this:

  • You need to assign full NTFS and share permissions to computer account of Hyper-V on a shared folder with ISO’s you want to mount.
  • In AD on the computer account of Hyper-V machine delegate specific service ‘cifs’ to the machine you want your ISO’s mounted from. Microsoft calls this constrained delegation.

Here is step by step procedure for the constrained delegation:

  1. Go to Active Directory Users and Computers
  2. Find the Hyper-V server computer account and open up its properties.
  3. Go to Delegation tab.
  4. Select Trust this computer for delegation to the specified services only radio button.
  5. Click the Add button.
  6. Click the Users or Computers… button.
  7. In the Add Services window, click Users or Computers and enter the computer account that will  act as a library server and click OK.
  8. Select the cifs Service Type and click OK.

The resulting setup should look something like this:

Constrained delegation
What the configuration should look like for constrained delegation

I added both the server that contained the ISO images and the server that I run my RSAT tools from just to be safe. I next rebooted the Hyper-V host (that is a requirement).
When the host rebooted, I was able to successfully create the VM.

Hopefully, this will also solve my issue with live migration between my hosts. I will have to test that again and will inform everyone here if that succeeds as well!

PLEASE COMMENT!
THANKS FOR READING!

References:
Hyper-V Server 2012 won’t mount ISO from a network share
Hyper-V authentication in Windows Server 2016 for managing remote Hyper-V servers through RSAT
Constrained Delegation