Purging Soft Deleted mailboxes from Exchange Server

If you’re a seasoned administrator, you have knowledge that in Exchange, the database settings will allow you to set the deleted mailbox retention. The default is 30 days, but sometimes you need to purge all those deleted mailboxes to do some ‘spring cleaning’ as it were. Note that doing these cmdlets does not change the ‘Whitespace’ of the database or the size. In my case, I had to purge everything of a toxic individual that was tainting my network much to my disappointment and did the following to complete that task.

The following cmdlet will seek all Soft Deleted mailboxes within the database you select and manually purge them from Exchange.

Now, should you only want to remove one mailbox, you will need to get the GUID of that Soft Deleted mailbox first so that you can enter it for the identity parameter.

You can also preform a similar task for a disabled mailbox:

You can perform the task on all disabled mailboxes for that database as well:

NOTE: I would be very careful when performing either of these cmdlets as they will completely purge the mailboxes from the schema. If these cmdlets assist you with your ‘spring cleaning’, I will have been happy to assist.

HAPPY PURGING!
PLEASE COMMENT!
IGNORANCE IS NOT BLISS!

References:
Purging Deleted Mailboxes on Exchange 2013

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Moving mailboxes to O365 via PowerShell in Hybrid Configuration

As many of you have knowledge, I am studying for my MS-202 Exam. And, part of the knowledge needed is to be able to migrate mailboxes between on premises and Exchange Online through PowerShell. Here are the steps for the scenario to move a mailbox from on premises to O365:

1. Connect to Exchange Online via PowerShell

If you have read my previous post: Connect to All PowerShell Modules in O365 with one script
You should have all the settings needed to connect your PowerShell to O365. Note in this scenario, that all these cmdlets will be run from O365 PowerShell and will be monitored from O365 by either PowerShell or the Exchange Admin Center. You will not be able to monitor the moves from On-Premises.

2. Provide your on premises Migration Administrator credentials as a variable for your cmdlet.

3. Move a single mailbox.

In your hybrid configuration you should be doing directory sync with O365/Azure and the accounts should be available in the cloud showing that they are synced with AD. This also assumes that you have your MRS Proxy endpoint enabled, which can be done by the HCW. Also, make sure you have your licensing available for your mailboxes. From my knowledge, you can assign your license to the account in the cloud before moving, especially if you have a particular license that you need to assign the account. Other than that, moving the mailbox will assign an existing license that is available that includes an Exchange Online mailbox feature when the mailbox is moved.
Now we initiate the move with the cmdlet. Similar to what you would do in the GUI, this simple mailbox move cmdlet initiates the move request. It has most of the same parameters as a local move request including BadItemLimit, LargeItemLimit, AcceptLargeDataLoss, etc…
 
Use the following LINK for documentation on the New-MoveRequest cmdlet.

Now with all migration projects, we expect to have to move multiple mailboxes in a single batch. The following will show the process for moving mailboxes in bulk from on premises to O365:

1. Connect to Exchange Online via PowerShell

If you have read my previous post: Connect to All PowerShell Modules in O365 with one script
You should have all the settings needed to connect your PowerShell to O365. Note in this scenario, that all these cmdlets will be run from O365 PowerShell and will be monitored from O365 by either PowerShell or the Exchange Admin Center. You will not be able to monitor the moves from On-Premises.

2. Provide your on premises Migration Administrator credentials as a variable for your cmdlet.

3. Move multiple mailboxes in a single batch.

In your hybrid configuration you should be doing directory sync with O365/Azure and the accounts should be available in the cloud showing that they are synced with AD. This also assumes that you have your MRS Proxy endpoint enabled, which can be done by the HCW. Also, make sure you have your licensing available for your mailboxes. From my knowledge, you can assign your license to the account in the cloud before moving, especially if you have a particular license that you need to assign the account. Other than that, moving the mailbox will assign an existing license that is available that includes an Exchange Online mailbox feature when the mailbox is moved.

This time you want to create a CSV file using the alias or emailaddress as your header and then list the appropriate value for all the users in your batch group. Save the file locally as MigrationBatch01.csv or a name of your choice.

Use EMailAddress
 OR
 Alias as the header

Next you initiate the mailbox moves. When specifying the mailbox identity in the cmdlet, use the respective header in your variable declaration (either $user.EMailAddress OR $user.Alias)

Use the following LINK for documentation on the New-MoveRequest cmdlet.

GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR MIGRATIONS!
HAPPY TROUBLESHOOTING!

References:
Moving Individual Mailboxes to O365
Move Mailboxes in Bulk to O365
PowerShell Mailbox Migration to O365
Connect to all PowerShell Modules in O365 with one script
New-MoveRequest Microsoft Document