Issue with opening AIP/MIP Protected PDF Documents in Microsoft Edge

Over the past few weeks, I have been doing my own deep dive study into MIP/AIP. I was looking at the following article:

Which PDF readers are supported for protected PDFs?

This article said that the later versions of the Edge Browser should natively be able to open and view MIP UL Protected PDF documents:


So I proceeded to do a Edge browser check on my Windows 10 test machine:

Approved Version 86 of Edge

Great! I should be able to protect a PDF file as Confidential, and then be able to open it in Edge with no other software required.

This was NOT the case.

I protected the PDF:

File set to Confidential Label

I waited a few minutes and then tried to open the file. I received the following error:

I received a permissions error and not the standard blocking error

Another issue with this error is that I did not receive the standard issued AIP Protection error that you should get like you would when opening a protected document without the proper plug-in with Adobe Reader:

The error in Edge said to check ownership permissions, which I did:

Amy C. Carlson is my test user for this scenario.

I could also go back into the AIP/MIP client and remove the Confidential label from the file. So, I was puzzled at this point. I then proceeded to install Adobe Reader DC and the AIP Plug-In as described in the original article.

Download MIP Adobe Plug-In

Once that was completed, I was able to logon as the account, open the document in Adobe Reader DC AND in Edge.

File opened successfully after installing the plug-in

According to the article, you should not need the plug in or any other product to open the protected file in Edge after protection is applied. Has anyone else experienced this issue and can explain why the article is not doing as said. I would love to hear any answers you may have on this subject!

PLEASE COMMENT!
THANK YOU FOR READING!

REFERENCES:
Which PDF readers are supported for protected PDFs?
MIP plug-in for Acrobat and Acrobat Reader 
Azure Information Protection Reader

Protected AD Groups and the problems they can cause accounts

I have run into this issue over the years with accounts being in the Domain Admins group and having issues running PowerShell cmdlets as well as not being able to connect to ActiveSync from a mobile device with the account.

These issues are due to the AdminSDHolder Template in AD and the SDProp Process that is run every 60 Minutes in AD.
This is explained in fantastic detail through the following Microsoft article: Protected Accounts & Groups In Active Directory

Here is an example of an issue that occurred in one of the environments that I was managing. A user was trying to run the following AD cmdlet in PowerShell on DC01:

The user got the following error when the cmdlet was executed:

Set-ADUser : Insufficient access rights to perform the operation
At line:1 char:1
+ Set-ADUser lancel -Server dc01.ldlnet.org -Replace @{title=”Senior O …
+ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ CategoryInfo: NotSpecified: (lancel:ADUser) [Set-ADUser], ADException
+ FullyQualifiedErrorId : ActiveDirectoryServer:8344,Microsoft.ActiveDirectory.Management.Commands.SetADUser

The issue was that the admin account used to run the cmdlet was in the Domain Admins group and was not inheriting permissions per the AdminSDHolder template that was applied to the account:

I checked to see that the admin account was in a protected group:

I next went to the Security Tab > Advanced Button and saw that the Enable Inheritance button was visible:

I’ve circled where to look in the window.

This verifies that the account is protected due to being in the Domain Admins group. Now, there are two workarounds for this particular error that we were experiencing.

  1. Click the Enable Inheritance button. This will cause the permissions to be inherited temporarily. When SDProp is cycled again, the account will lose any inherited permissions and will be essentially “broken” again. This is not good if you’re going to be running cmdlets regularly to modify AD Accounts.
  2. The preferred method to work around this issue is to set the -Server parameter to point to a different DC than the one you are on. So, essentially, we tell the cmdlet to execute on DC02 when running the cmdlet from DC01.

Either method will allow the cmdlet to execute successfully and modify the object. You would think that Microsoft would have noticed this issue with running an admin cmdlet for Active Directory, but they have not fixed this issue as of yet nor do i think they plan to. I would just go with workaround number two and remain sane.

Another example of this Protected Group issue comes with an account in a Protected Group that has a mailbox not being able to connect to Exchange ActiveSync when setting up their mobile device.

  • You usually get a 500 error on the device that you cannot connect.
  • You will also see event 1053 in Event Viewer alluding to not having sufficient access to create the container for the user in AD.

Read this page for more information: Exchange ActiveSync Permissions Issue with Protected Groups

So, in your endeavors admins, keep this in mind when running into these types of problems. Happy Troubleshooting!